Green improvements in school buildings have positive impacts on student performance, show new WorldGBC infographics

Wednesday 29th November 2017

 

Achieving optimal levels in school buildings for air quality, lighting, temperature and acoustics through green improvements, can help students achieve their full potential, new infographics from the World Green Building Council show.

“The environment of a school building has a tremendous impact on how a student learns,” said World Green Building Council CEO, Terri Wills. “It would seem obvious that if a student can’t hear their teacher, or is too hot to concentrate, that their performance would suffer, but many don’t realise that factors like CO2 levels and types of lighting, can also make a big difference on how students perform academically.

“By designing schools that are energy efficient, low carbon, and that priortise health and wellbeing, we can ensure students spend some of the most important days of their lives learning in truly green schools.”

The infographics, compiled by the World Green Building Council, summarise global research over the past two decades, and identify lighting, indoor air quality, thermal comfort and acoustics as key areas where sustainable improvements can positively affect students.

Key findings for each environmental factor, include:

  • Lighting – Students in the US showed a 36% increase in oral reading fluency when exposed to high-intensity light, while those in standard lighting conditions increased by only 16%
  • Indoor air quality – Every 100 parts per million increase in CO2 was associated to a roughly one-half day per year reduction in UK school attendance
  • Thermal comfort - Students citing their classroom as ‘comfortable’ achieved 4% more correct answers in a maths test compared to those who were hot, according to a survey of more than 4,000 Finnish students
  • Acoustics –  For every 10 decibel increase in noise, the language and maths scores of French students decreased by 5.5 points

Optimising lighting, indoor air quality, thermal comfort and acoustics can not only help to improve students’ learning outcomes, but – depending on the strategy used – can reduce energy use and lower carbon emissions in schools. For example, providing ample windows and energy efficient LED lighting can reduce emissions and create a productive and healthy school environment.

Today’s infographics are released under WorldGBC’s global project Better Places for People which has examined the health, wellbeing and productivity benefits of green buildings, and specifically offices and retail buildings. The project is sponsored by Delos, Saint-Gobain and Skanska.

Read the full press release. View the infographics here.

 

Achieving optimal levels in school buildings for air quality, lighting, temperature and acoustics through green improvements, can help students achieve their full potential, new infographics from the World Green Building Council show.

“The environment of a school building has a tremendous impact on how a student learns,” said World Green Building Council CEO, Terri Wills. “It would seem obvious that if a student can’t hear their teacher, or is too hot to concentrate, that their performance would suffer, but many don’t realise that factors like CO2 levels and types of lighting, can also make a big difference on how students perform academically.

“By designing schools that are energy efficient, low carbon, and that priortise health and wellbeing, we can ensure students spend some of the most important days of their lives learning in truly green schools.”

The infographics, compiled by the World Green Building Council, summarise global research over the past two decades, and identify lighting, indoor air quality, thermal comfort and acoustics as key areas where sustainable improvements can positively affect students.

Key findings for each environmental factor, include:

  • Lighting – Students in the US showed a 36% increase in oral reading fluency when exposed to high-intensity light, while those in standard lighting conditions increased by only 16%
  • Indoor air quality – Every 100 parts per million increase in CO2 was associated to a roughly one-half day per year reduction in UK school attendance
  • Thermal comfort - Students citing their classroom as ‘comfortable’ achieved 4% more correct answers in a maths test compared to those who were hot, according to a survey of more than 4,000 Finnish students
  • Acoustics –  For every 10 decibel increase in noise, the language and maths scores of French students decreased by 5.5 points

Optimising lighting, indoor air quality, thermal comfort and acoustics can not only help to improve students’ learning outcomes, but – depending on the strategy used – can reduce energy use and lower carbon emissions in schools. For example, providing ample windows and energy efficient LED lighting can reduce emissions and create a productive and healthy school environment.

Today’s infographics are released under WorldGBC’s global project Better Places for People which has examined the health, wellbeing and productivity benefits of green buildings, and specifically offices and retail buildings. The project is sponsored by Delos, Saint-Gobain and Skanska.

Read the full press release. View the infographics here.