Case Study - The Phenix

Building Details

Building Name The Phenix
Construction / refurbishment dateMon, 04/07/2016
Building Size8825.78
Building Type
Academic
Commercial
Healthcare
Industrial
Residential (single)
Residential (multi-unit)
Retail
Other
Address 3500 St Jacques St
Montreal
Quebec
H4C 1H2
Canada
Region North America

Performance Details

Health and Wellbeing

Buildings or projects that display best practice approaches that enhance the health and wellbeing of their occupants, and as such have been verified and certified as "healthy" projects.

Qualification criteria:FITWEL
Qualification level achieved, if applicable:3 stars
Verification year:2019

Net Zero Operational Carbon

Buildings or developments that display best practice outcomes in energy efficiency, are powered by renewable energy, and as such have been verified and certified as "net zero energy and/or carbon" projects.

Qualification criteria:CaGBC Zero Carbon Standard
Other certification scheme and level achieved, if applicable:LEED Certification New Construction
Offsite Renewable Energy Procured:300 000
Offsite renewable energy procurement source:Hydro
Verification year:2019

Submitter's Details

Organisation Lemay
Member of GBC CaGBC, USGBC

Additional Details

The Phenix, Lemay’s montreal office, is a truly unique laboratory for the firm’s innovations in sustainable strategies and collaborative workspace design. Drawing on solid expertise in sustainability and experience in carrying out projects with high environmental ambitions, Lemay has developed a rigorous approach that allows it to reach a higher level in the integration of sustainable strategies into its projects. Net Positive generates concrete and tangible initiatives in three areas: health, environment and carbon. Health: As the human experience is at the heart of our mission, we design healthy living environments where everyone can flourish. Environment: As the planet’s balance is fragile, we use our expertise to protect all of its components. Carbon: As the challenges related to climate change are particularly critical, we focus on the carbon footprint to assess both our concepts and the real impact of our projects.

For Lemay, the decision to retrofit the Phenix instead of designing and constructing a new building was significant as it resulted in a much lower carbon footprint that that of a new build. Construction and operations over 60 years of a comparable new office building would have equaled a carbon footprint of nearly 12,000 tonnes of CO2; in comparison, the renovation and building operations over a similar period equate to approximately 1,600 tonnes of CO2, representing a reduction of more than 86 per cent.

The project’s design also minimized the use of new materials by retaining the structural concrete of the building’s floors and columns and original brick walls. As a result, the project team was able to divert 93 per cent of the construction and demolition waste from landfills.

Other features and initiatives that helped Lemay reduce its carbon footprint and achieve ZCB-Performance certification include:

  • An upgrade of the building envelope’s thermal performance through the inclusion of triple-pane windows on the north façade and improvements to roof insulation, reducing energy consumption related to heating and air conditioning;
  • Advanced LED lighting systems with motion sensors, daylight sensors and an operation schedule based on building occupancy;
  • An integrated solar wall that preheats the building’s ventilation air intake;
  • Installation of 379 photovoltaic (PV) panels with a total capacity of 134 kW;
  • Hydronic radiant heating;
  • Thermal and electrical energy storage systems to manage demand during winter peak periods; and,
  • The purchase of 100 tonnes of CO2 equivalent in carbon offsets to compensate for < 94 tonnes of carbon emissions related to energy consumption

Health and well-being features:

  • Biophilic design plan for the project (indoor and outdoor)
  • Active design plan including the main staircase connecting all building floors (more visible than elevator)
  • Increased green space and biodiversity on the site
  • Provision of showers, lockers and bicycle parking to encourage the use of active transportation
  • Community connectivity and access to proximity services
  • Indoor Air Quality Management Plan
  • Specification of low VOC and low emission materials
  • High-efficiency air filtration media (MERV 13)
  • Thermal sensors to ensure occupant comfort
  • CO2 sensors to control fresh air
  • Access to daylight in all the regularly occupied areas
  • Access to quality views in all the regularly occupied areas
  • Installation of operable windows on all façades
  • Nap room, multifunctional room and quiet room available for employees
  • Gym with activities program for employees
  • Indoor and outdoor art to inspire and emotionally appeal people humanizing the working environment
  • Integration of vegetation and green walls into workspaces
  • Complex patterns, time patina and biomorphic forms in the interior design to ensure all building users have access to a certain degree of biophilic design
  • Water filters to ensure high quality drinking water and taste of the water
  • Outdoor lunch area with picnic tables, outdoor art sculptures, benches and chairs along the linear park
  • Nature-inspired design; natural materials such as salvaged wood and fabrics on the wall finishes of the meeting rooms
  • All the interior corridor has vertical modules with evergreen climbing plants that bring colors during winter months, purifies the air and allow users to take a break in a place of respite.

The Phenix has won 2 awards specific to Health and well-being :

  • 2019 Stephen R. Kellert Biophilic Design Award, in the Interior/Renovation category, By the International Living Future Institute,
  • Best in Building Health award as Fitwel 2019 Highest Scoring Project, in the Multi-Tenant Whole Building category, by the Center for Active Design.

 

Find out more about this case study here.

"For Lemay, the decision to retrofit the Phenix instead of designing and constructing a new building was significant as it resulted in a much lower carbon footprint that that of a new build. Construction and operations over 60 years of a comparable new office building would have equaled a carbon footprint of nearly 12,000 tonnes of CO2; in comparison, the renovation and building operations over a similar period equate to approximately 1,600 tonnes of CO2, representing a reduction of more than 86 per cent."